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Best things to do in County Clare

Discover the city according to locals. Find the best things to do, places to eat, and get priceless advice from the people who live here.

Natural Feature
“One of Ireland natural wonders a mst see. 40 minutes drive. Lots to see en route like lahinch, liscannor bay etc.”
79local recommendations
Scenic Lookout
“The Cliffs of Moher on the Wild Atlantic Way is one of Ireland's top tourist attractions, with breathtaking views of the Atlantic Ocean and Irish coastline. A must see. Easy day trip at 1 hour 45 mins from The Calves Field”
70local recommendations
Natural Feature
“Located just off the coast of Galway are the Irish-speaking Aran Islands. The largest of the three islands, Inis Mór, has been described as 'one of the world’s top island destinations' by National Geographic. Reachable by ferry from Rossaveal, a 5-minute drive from Tigh Tommy Connolly, the welcoming island is home to the World Heritage site Dún Aonghasa, a Bronze Age fort set on dramatic 300 feet high cliff. ”
57local recommendations
Castle
“Set on 26 acres, the impressive park features over 30 buildings in a ‘living’ village and rural setting. Rural farmhouses, village shops and streets are recreated and furnished as they would have appeared at that time according to their social standing, from the poorest one roomed dwelling to Bunratty House a fine example of a Georgian residence built 1804 home of the Studdarts, the last family to occupy Bunratty Castle.”
58local recommendations
Tourist Information Center
“The Visitor Centre in Corrofin has a great exhibit on the natural history of the Burren and from here you can get a shuttle bus into the National Park. The centre also has lots of information on walking routes in the park and the shuttle bus links to the walks.”
68local recommendations
Cave
“The Aillwee Cave is one of the many caves beneath the Burren. It was formed by glacial melt waters that seeped through the cracks in the limestone pavement during an early ice-age. It is the oldest cave in the Burren at 1.5 million years old, and boasts some of the most spectacular stalactites and stalagmites in Ireland . The powerful flow of these melt waters eroded through the rock, forming a subterranean river. Since the last ice-age, this river has subsided, leaving in its place one of Ireland ’s most spectacular caves. The largest area in the cave is known as The Highway, which is located at the centre of the cave. The cave was inhabited by animals for thousands of years before it was discovered by man. Hibernation pits dug out by bears were found in the cave, as well as bones of a brown bear. Bears are no longer found in Ireland , and have been extinct here for over 1,000 years. ”
42local recommendations
Museum
“Very centrally located with a good coffee shop. A great collection of serious antiquities and a nice gift shop”
29local recommendations
Establishment
“Restored 13th Century fortress with a visitor centre and interactive exhibits.”
19local recommendations
Perfume Shop
“We make perfumes and cosmetics using natural and organic ingredients. We take our inspiration from the landscape around us. Everything is made by hand, on site, in the Burren. We have a free audiovisual presentation on the flora and fauna of the Burren for you to enjoy when you visit. Relax in the rose-covered Tea Rooms, which serve a mouth watering selection of organic cakes, scones and pies. Homemade soups with freshly baked bread, selections of local cheeses and salads all made with organic vegetables... ”
44local recommendations
Natural Feature
“Fishermen come from near and far to sample the delights of Lough Derg, County Clare for all an Angler needs.”
19local recommendations
Castle
“The stunning exhibition at King John’s Castle brings to life over 800 years of dramatic local history. Explore the visitor centre with state of the art interpretive activities and exhibitions. 21st century touch screen technology, 3D models and discovery drawer are among the exciting techniques that will connect you to tales of siege and warfare. Children will love the dazzling array of computer generated animations and ghostly projections as they travel back through time. The Education and Activity Room is bustling with tasks to stimulate curious minds.”
16local recommendations
Park
“The heritage town of Gort can be found in south County Galway, about 37km south of Galway city on the N18. Just outside the town of Gort, is where you’ll find the beautiful Coole Park, formerly the estate of Lady Gregory but now a 1,000 acre nature reserve. Coole Park estate was once the home of Lady Augusta Gregory who was pivotal to the Irish literary revival and was co-founder of the Abbey Theatre. Coole House was a focal point for many meetings about Irish literature which were attended by George Bernard Shaw, J.M. Synge, Sean O Casey and William Butler Yeats. Coole Park was often referred to in stories and poems eg. W.B Yeats was so inspired by the beauty and tranquillity here that he wrote a poem called “The Wild Swans at Coole”.The most unique features of Coole Park are the turloughs (seasonal lakes or also called disappearing lakes) which are said to be the best examples of turloughs in the world. The park is situated on a low lying karst area of land and due to this the park has been designated a Special Area of Conservation. As you stroll around Coole Park you’ll see different types of animals and mammals in their natural environments. Coole Park is also an important sanctuary for birds especially winter waterfowl. At Coole Park you’ll also find a very informative and educational Visitor’s Centre, which is well worth a visit. Here you can see audio-visual presentations about Lady Gregory herself and you’ll also see some exhibitions telling the story and history of Coole Park. The park is open all year round and there is free admission to the grounds, so it’s a great day out for the family. There’s also a restaurant on site if you want to enjoy a wide selection of traditional Irish dishes. ”
30local recommendations
Beach
“Lahinch Beach is located a short drive from the Cliffs of Moher and is therefore very popular with locals and tourists alike. The flooding tide makes it ideal for surfing, sea kayaking and kite surfing and there are a few surfing schools in the local area. Lahinch is a popular resort town with many restaurants and accommodation. The beach is lifeguarded during the bathing season and more information can be found on the noticeboard located at the beach. This beach has received the International Blue Flag award for 2019.”
19local recommendations
Golf Course
“Lahinch is hosting the Irish open in July 2019 It has been described as ‘The St Andrews of Ireland’ and many other complimentary titles. Those who know and love the place firmly believe that Lahinch Golf Club doesn’t need comparison with any of the game’s other world class venues. From the infant days back in 1892 up to its 125th anniversary, the Club has stood out on its own merits as a golfing institution like none other. Lahinch Golf Club is renowned for the way the links has retained all of its old virtues. It has benefited from the willingness, over the decades, to move with the times and is now regarded as one of the best and most enjoyable challenges to be found anywhere in the golfing world. The legendary Old Tom Morris set the highest standards for the course from the outset. He was followed by equally celebrated architects Charles ‘Mo’ Gibson and Dr Alister MacKenzie. In more recent times, the expertise of Dr Martin Hawtree ensures its place in the higher echelons of all golf rankings. Lahinch is a remarkable club whose growth, vibrancy and spirit are charted in the pages of its centenary publication – 125 Years of Golf at Lahinch.”
18local recommendations
Bar
“This bar is one of the most popular in Limerick and very centrally located.”
18local recommendations
Restaurant
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“The best seafood around and a great pub. it is a nice scenic drive to get there as well.”
25local recommendations