Skip to content

Parks and nature in Atlanta

Top parks

Park
“Closest major park. Great for cycling, sight seeing, and close by to bars and restaurants to your liking”
  • 283 locals recommend
Garden
“Since the Garden opened its doors in 1976, it has become the emerald jewel in the crown of Atlanta culture. The Garden is an ever-evolving destination where the horticulturally-minded, nature-inspired and fun-seeking families come together to feel human again. Renowned plant collections, beautiful displays and spectacular exhibitions make the Atlanta Botanical Garden the loveliest place in the city to visit. An urban oasis in the heart of Midtown, the Garden includes 30 acres of outdoor gardens, an award-winning Children’s Garden, the serene Storza Woods highlighted by a unique Canopy Walk, and the picturesque Skyline Garden. The Gainesville location, opened in 2015, celebrates years of planning and development of one of North Georgia’s most beautiful landscapes aimed at connecting visitors with both the natural world and cultural amenities. It is home to the largest conservation nursery in the Southeast.”
  • 147 locals recommend
Park
“Historic park that has been around for decades that is perfect for any tourist, or local. Paid parking available.”
  • 118 locals recommend
Cemetery
“Oakland Cemetery is one of the largest cemetery green spaces, in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. Founded as Atlanta Cemetery in 1850 on six acres of land southeast of the city, it was renamed in 1872 to reflect the large number of oak and magnolia trees growing in the area. By that time, the city had grown and the cemetery had enlarged correspondingly to the current 48 acres. Since then, Atlanta has continued to expand so that the cemetery is now located in the center of the city. Oakland is an excellent example of a Victorian-style cemetery, and reflects the "garden cemetery" movement started and exemplified by Mount Auburn Cemetery in Massachusetts. The original 6 acres of Oakland remains one of the oldest historical plots of land in Atlanta, most of the rest of the city having been burned in 1864. Because of its age and location, the cemetery directly reflects the history and changing culture of the City of Atlanta and the significant events it has seen. Names of Atlanta streets, buildings, parks, subdivisions, and more can be found within the cemetery gates. ”
  • 128 locals recommend
Garden
“The Atlanta Botanical Garden is a 30 acres botanical garden located adjacent to Piedmont Park in Midtown Atlanta, Georgia, United States. Incorporated in 1976, the garden's mission is to "develop and maintain plant collections for the purposes of display, education, conservation, research and enjoyment.”
  • 61 locals recommend
History Museum
“The Carter Presidential Library was built by Atlanta architectural firm, Jova/Daniels/Busby, in cooperation with Lawton/Umemura/Yamamoto of Hawaii who designed the structure. The facility includes the presidential library (donated to the federal government) and privately maintained spaces such as President Carter’s office, offices for foundations he supports, and The Carter Center of Emory University. The $26 million project, raised by donations from friends of President Carter from around the world, began with a ground breaking ceremony on October 2, 1984. The Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum was dedicated during the museum opening on October 1, 1986.”
  • 46 locals recommend
Nature Preserve
“Cascade Springs Nature Preserve to a beautiful waterfall, a moss-covered historic springhouse, and mounded earthworks from the Civil War battle of Utoy Creek.”
  • 35 locals recommend

Playgrounds

Park
“Centennial Olympic Park is a 21-acre public park located in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. It was built by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games as part of the infrastructure improvements for the 1996 Summer Olympics.”
  • 27 locals recommend
Playground
“The BEST park in town! Hands down. Huge and very well lit. Food trucks in the summer on Tuesdays. Great for walking and jogging for you or the dog or the kids! ”
  • 6 locals recommend
Playground
“ This park is a true community meeting point that is full of great neighbors and laughing children. On any given day you might find a community concert, neighborhood yoga, or dog obedience classes going on.”
  • 2 locals recommend
Park
“Large park near CNN Center and GA Aquarium. Check out your Olympic brick if you bought one in 1996. The Park's website will locate it for you. Get your hansom cab ride here.”
  • 1 local recommends
Playground
“Right down the street, lots of open space and sports and exercise facilities”
  • 1 local recommends
Playground
  • 1 local recommends

Trails

Park
“Wonderful park with bike trails, calm shade trees, and right next to Little 5 Points. The area was saved from becoming yet another highway and turned into a park by actions from Jimmy Carter”
  • 13 locals recommend
Trail
“Paved biking / walking trail, branches off Beltline trail, connects to downtown Atl, Inman Park, Old 4th Ward, Candler Park, VA Highlands, Little 5 Points, MLK Jr Natl Historic Site.”
  • 9 locals recommend
Trail
“Great place to enjoy a walk, run or bike ride. The beltline winds throughout historic neighborhoods & has increasing shops & restaurants popping up along the way.”
  • 11 locals recommend
Trail
“One of the old walking trails where you can let your dog off leash and there's a BEACH!”
  • 12 locals recommend
Trail
“This actually wraps completely around ATL...some parts are still under construction. You can access it @ Krog Street ”
  • 3 locals recommend
Trail
“The Beltline is a great way to take in the city and get some recreation in too. Tons of places to eat, drink and be merry along the route. People watching is a plus. ”
  • 3 locals recommend
Trail
“Nice place for a stroll. Great place to take dogs -- There's a cool bridge. Lots of trees and shade. Can be muddy at times, so be prepared!”
  • 2 locals recommend
Trail
“As early as the 1960s the Georgia Department of Transportation began to draw up plans for a toll road that would link the Stone Mountain Freeway with Downtown Atlanta and extend Georgia 400 south to I-675. This crisscross of interstate-like toll roads had what are now some of Atlanta’s most desirable neighborhoods in its path – Inman Park, Candler Park, Druid Hills (designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, father of landscape architecture and designer of New York’s Central Park), Poncey-Highland, Virginia-Highland, Morningside, and Lake Claire. The Park now connects the many revived in-town neighborhoods.”
  • 2 locals recommend
0